Scientific Studies Search Results

How To: Express big & small numbers with scientific notation

See how to express very large and very small numbers using scientific notation with this free video math lesson from Internet pedagogical superstar Simon Khan. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Convert between scientific and decimal notation

Need to know how to convert between scientific and decimal notation? Learn how with this free video math lesson. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just study for that next big test).

How To: Convert from standard to scientific notation

Interested in converting numbers both into and out of scientific notation? This free video lesson will teach you everything you'll need to know. From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just finish your homework or study for that next big test).

How To: Convert large numbers into scientific notation

Confused about scientific notation? In this informative video, Doug Simms from free math tutoring helps you work with large numbers more efficiently by converting them into scientific notation. Let this expert walk you through easy to understand marker board examples covering all of the basics of scientific notation, including exponents, decimals, and how to convert numbers back and forth between different notation forms. Don't let confusing science problems get you down when Doug Simms is ar...

How To: Do three exercise moves to firm your butt

Every gal has her trouble areas, but it seems that most girls cite their belly and butt as the hardest areas to tone. After all, scientific studies have shown that these areas are the first place to gain weight and the last place that gets smaller when you're exercising to lose weight. Sad but true facts.

How To: Apply scientific notation

This video walks you through on how to apply scientific notation. This excellent video shows you a clean blackboard, with the instructors voice showing exactly what to do. Don't fret, any question you may have, will be answered. Watching this video will make you feel like your back in the classroom but rather comfortably from your home.

How To: There's a Hidden Scientific Calculator on Your iPhone

The Calculator app on your iPhone may seem boring and basic, but there are a few interesting tricks worth knowing. You can ask Siri to perform calculations for you, long-press on results to copy them, long-press the field to paste numbers in, and swipe left or right above the keypad to delete digits one by one. The app can also be used as a scientific calculator with just a simple maneuver.

How To: Make a model of a space comet

Are you an active or aspiring scientist? In this free educational video from National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, learn how to make a model of a comet, and why models are important to scientists. Get started on a scientific road to discovery with help from this excellent video on how to make a model of a space comet.

How To: Speak to women without scientific methods

In this video from DavidWygant he teaches how to speak to women without scientific methods. He shows us how to talk to women without using pickup lines. Pickup lines are causing you to lose women. You just have to talk like you usually talk. Talk to a woman like you talk to anyone. If you are comfortable with yourself you will make others comfortable in your presence. Talk to a girl like girls talk to each other. Do not try some crazy code. You just have to be yourself and that is the best wa...

How To: Make an electroscope for static electricty experiments

In this video, learn how to make your own homemade electroscope. An electroscope is an early scientific instrument that is used to detect the presence and magnitude of electric charge on a body and for static electricity experiments. They are easy to make. This electroscope is made from a binder clip and two sheets of plastic (or overhead transparency film), and scissors.

How To: Collect antique binoculars

This is a short video about collecting old or antique binoculars. This binocular video is helpful if you are interested in buying, selling, collecting or just learning about these old scientific instruments. This can help with all kinds of binoculars like Ross, Barr and Stroud, prismatic, or Galilean types.

How To: Measure cooking ingredients

Learn how to measure cooking ingredients. Some home cooks approach cooking as an art form, a splash of this, a dash of that, and soon each culinary creation is deliciously unique. Bakers are more likely to appreciate the scientific side of cooking, relying on the careful measuring of ingredients to ensure consistent results every time they prepare a recipe. To measure cooking ingredients, you'll need a glass measuring cup for liquids, and a dry measure for powders.

How To: Create a color explosion with this cool science experiement

Soap is an incredible thing and this how-to shows some of its incredible qualities. You'll need a plate, some whole mile, some food coloring, some Q-tips and some dish detergent. It's an explosion of color! Some very unusual things happen when you mix a little milk, food coloring, and a drop of liquid soap. Use the experiment to amaze your friends and uncover the scientific secrets of soap.

How To: Master weight and balance concepts with NASA

Join NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) as they give the basics on the concepts of weight and balance as applied to aerospace. There's no better place to learn about aviation theory than NASA, the United States government's most infamous agency--the powerhouse of space exploration.

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