Reaction Search Results

News: Facebook Reactions Are Live & Now You Can Die Happy

Have you ever run across a Facebook post that you don't necessarily want to "Like," but you're not really passionate enough about to bother stringing together a couple words for a comment? Well, you're in luck, as Facebook added five new "Reactions" that let you do more than just like a post, and they're now live for everyone.

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Use Telegram's GIF & Sticker Search to Find a Perfect Reaction for a Chat

Remember trying to express yourself over the 160-character limit on SMS texts? We've come a long way since then, and messaging services have nearly taken over with emoji, chat effects, custom interface colors, and other personalizations. Necessities for messages these days include GIFs and stickers, and Telegram makes it easy to find those perfect reactions for any moment.

How To: Understand organic molecules & elimination reaction

This video helps us understand the organic molecules and elimination reaction. Take some sugar in a beaker. Sugar has 12 carbon atoms, 22 hydrogen atoms and 11 atoms of oxygen. The sulphuric acid is poured into the sugar and the color change is observed. The color of the sugar gradually changes into black. The sulphuric acid causes an exothermic reaction which releases a large amount of sulphur dioxide gas. All the water (containing hydrogen and oxygen atoms) is eliminated out of the sugar du...

How To: Work with reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry

This free video science lesson from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan presents a general introduction to the concept of reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry. Whether you need help studying for that next big test or could just use a hand finishing your homework, you're sure to be well served by this video lesson. For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Work with reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry

In this free video science lesson from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan, you'll learn how to handle reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry. Whether you need help studying for that next big test or could just use a hand finishing your homework, you're sure to be well served by this video lesson. For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Use Markovnikov's rule to determine the likelihood of an addition reaction

In this free video science lesson from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan, you'll learn how to use Markovnikov's rule to figure out which addition reaction is most likely in organic chemistry. Whether you need help studying for that next big test or could just use a hand finishing your homework, you're sure to be well served by this video lesson. For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Solve SN1 & SN2 reaction problems that involve solvents in organic chemistry

In this free video science lesson from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan, you'll learn how to undertstand the effects of solvents on SN1 and SN2 reactions. Whether you need help studying for that next big test or could just use a hand finishing your homework, you're sure to be well served by this video lesson. For more information, including detailed, step-by-step instructions, take a look.

How To: Use spinnerbait to get reaction strikes when fishing

There are many different kinds of bait that can be used when bass fishing. One thing that is used is spinnerbait. Although it's not live bait, it's still something that will attract the attention of the fish very fast. Find out more about spinnerbait, why it's good to use, and how to use it in the tutorial above. Enjoy!

How To: Create a Miniature Fireworks Show by Burning Steel Wool & Potassium Chlorate

We've all seen some the awesome fireworks that steel wool can produce, either in person or on video— and as simple as it is, we just can't get enough of it! It's really basic chemistry, but sometimes simplicity can amaze more than complexity. And in this video, our favorite web scientist, NurdRage, battles the burning flame of one of the world's most common household item, i.e. the Brillo Pad. Plus, there's an even bigger reaction towards the end with an added chemical compound).

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Make hydrazine sulfate with the hypochlorite and the Ketazine process

Hydrazine sulfate has many uses, but most notably, it's been used under the trade name of Sehydrin, a treatment for anorexia, cachexia and some even think cancer. But for we DIY chemists, it's useful for something entirely different— as a substitute for the more dangerous pure liquid hydrazine in chemical reactions. NurdRage shows you how to make it via some hypochlorite and the Ketazine process.

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