Psychology Search Results

How To: Practice the art of street cons with Michael Shermer

The art of the con is as old as civilization, employing the skills of deception, misdirection, and the psychology of human greed and the desire to get something for nothing. In this episode Shermer employs a professional con artist to teach him the fine art of conning people. He shows a street game where you follow the queen. Unfortunately, you're being scammed. Three card monte will always take your money. It's a straight out con.

How To: Spot poker tells

Even good poker players can slip up and give a tell once in a while. As a good poker player you need to spot those tell tale signs of weakness. Learn how to spot poker tells and other table psychology tips with this tutorial. With this how to video you can read your opponents and bet in confidence the next time you are at the poker table.

How To: Determine if someone's lying via Visual Accessing Cues

This video demonstrates how you can tell if someone is lying using visual accessing cues. This is a sample video of Kelley Moore teaching for a breakthrough collaborative application. She uses basic psychology terms to aid in understanding when someone lies. A sample visual cue for lying is to notice the eyes. If someone is lying, their eyes would twitch or unconsciously shift to the left side. If you follow the steps in this video, you'll be able to notice when someone is lying to you.

How To: 16 Tips for Staying Awake When You're Tired

While there's an art to surviving the all-nighter, there's also an art to staying awake throughout the day when you're operating on little to no sleep. In 1964, the record for sleep deprivation was set by 17-year-old Randy Gardner, who stayed awake for an incredible 264 hours and 12 minutes. Now while we're not out to challenge Randy for his title, we can certainly look to him for inspiration in beating back our own fatigue.

Slow Down: Too Much Productivity Can Be a Bad Thing

Our workdays are typically filled with one thought: get as much completed as possible. Whether you face an inbox filled with tasks or just a project or two, both our bosses and our inner workhorses encourage us to knock out as many tasks as we can each day. But is being super-productive the best course of action for our minds and our employers?

News: Virtual Reality, Coming to a Dentist's Office Near You

I don't know anyone that likes going to the dentist—few things are more uncomfortable than having someone else's hands in your mouth. But outside of that, not only can the pain of certain procedures be unnerving, the drugs used to numb those pains can be just as uncomfortable. Not being able to feel your mouth for hours on end is a disconcerting feeling. But all that could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to virtual reality.

How To: Like the Way You Smell? You're Making Yourself More Attractive

Each morning, we spend a significant portion of our time staring into the mirror. From choosing clothes and accessories to perfecting our hair, we try to make ourselves attractive. Yet catching others' attention doesn't have to rely on preening and primping. There's some truth to the maxim of beauty in confidence—all you need to make yourself more attractive is spray on your favorite scent.

How To: Make Healthier Food Choices by Clenching Your Fists

We've all walked into a restaurant with the best of intentions only to order something absurd, like a cheese-injected burger topped with bacon on a brioche bun. It's delicious for the few minutes it takes to eat the thing, and then you're left with a bellyful of regret and an inability to directly look at the numbers on your scale. Turns out that getting yourself to make healthy choices isn't as hard as one might think.

Today's Tidbit: Know Your Limitations

Dianne Tice and Roy Baumeister gave a bunch of college students a questionnaire in which the students answered questions about their work habits. In a class which she taught, Tice also assigned a paper with a deadline which she said could be extended and observed which students availed themselves of the option to extend.

How To: The Scientific Methods for Boosting Your Willpower

Willpower is a pretty significant word. It's the difference between sticking with a clean eating diet and diving face-first into a plate of brownies. It's what drags you out of bed on Monday mornings and into work rather than letting you stay snuggled under the covers asleep. And, most importantly, it's the kick in the butt we all require to both accomplish goals and make changes.

How To: Improve Your Memory by Daydreaming

When you're trapped at your desk before a jumble of data just waiting to be categorized, or zoning out during an important meeting, your mind wanders and, chances are, you feel a little guilty because of it. Yet you shouldn't try to reign in that distracted thinking. Instead, let your brain get distracted, and you'll unconsciously strengthen your memory.

How To: Quiet an Overthinking Mind

We all carry a bit of anxiety around with us. Is our boss still annoyed because we could barely stay awake in yesterday's pre-dawn meeting? Will our friend hate us forever because we forgot to call them back two weeks ago? Whatever worries pop up in your mind, whether they're monumental or insignificant, it can be hard to quiet those nagging voices, but you can shut down your nonstop mind with a bit of relaxation, distraction, and action.

How To: Spot an Undercover Narcissist

Humans in general are great at keeping things about themselves private, from feelings to personality traits. While smartphones and social networks are making these secrets more open, narcissists have and always will love being out in the open with everyone's attention on them.

Study: You'll Remember More by Photographing Less

Thanks to the steady increase in quality of smartphone cameras, it's easier than ever to take amazing photos or video without thinking twice. If you've been to a concert in the last five years, you undoubtedly know what I mean. But it turns out that using your camera as a new set of eyes might actually be ruining your ability to remember events on your own, rather than helping you to hold on to the good times.

How To: 10 Reasons Why It's Better to Be a Jerk

Nice people finish first—or is it last? Though you may have been told throughout your life that being kind pays off, there are some obvious advantages to getting mean. So whether you're driving towards a goal at work, or need to attack a task in your personal life, acting like a jerk just might help you get what you want.

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