Install Xposed Search Results

How To: Install Xposed on Almost Any Phone Running Android 10 & Below

Well before Magisk was in our lives, the Xposed framework was where all the mods and magic happened. Magisk was built on a similar concept with the ability to customize your system via modules. We can thank Xposed for where we are today in terms of root-related mods, but it's not done just yet — it's still very much alive and kicking after all these years.

How To: Get Faster Access to Settings for Your Installed Xposed Mods on the Nexus 7

If you're reading this, chances are you're utilizing Xposed Framework to apply unique customizations to your device . We've covered various Xposed mods, like how to how to unlock KitKat's full screen capabilty and make your battery percentage easier to read on the Nexus 7, but today, we're showing you an Xposed module for Xposed. In order to access the modules on your device, you typically enter the Xposed Installer, go to Modules, then select your mod. Easy enough, right? Well, things just g...

Xposed 101: How to Install Unofficial Modules

The Xposed Framework has an official repository for downloading modules which can be easily accessed by searching the Download section in your Xposed Installer app. But not every module is available on the Xposed repo — in fact, many unique and interesting modules are only hosted on third-party servers.

How To: Get Rid of the Annoying Low Battery Alert for Good on Your Samsung Galaxy Note 2

If you use your Samsung Galaxy Note 2 consistently throughout the day, you're more than likely to encounter the low battery warning on occasion—anytime you dip below 15 percent remaining. While the low battery warning may be a convenience for some, it can also be a nuisance for others (like me), as it continues to appear intermittently after dropping from that 15 percent. In this softModder tutorial, I'm going to show you how to get rid of that annoying low battery alert for good.

How To: Secure Your Samsung Galaxy Device by Disabling the Clipboard History

Whether you use a third-party keyboard or the stock offering, your Samsung device keeps a history of the last 20 words you copied on its clipboard. Samsung added this feature to Android to help make multitasking a bit easier, but if you use a password manager like LastPass, this feature quickly becomes a gaping hole in security. While you're copying and pasting your various passwords, the last 20 of them become freely available to anyone that gets their hands on your device.

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