Coloration Gene Search Results

How To: Draw a simple and colorful clownfish (pez payaso)

Capture the charisma of the clown and the charm of a marine fish into a masterpiece called the clownfish! Actually, the clownfish is as real as they come, with bold vertical stripes and bright coloration, and are sometimes referred to as anemone fish, because they live in close proximity to anemones. This video illustrates the step-by-step details to drawing a clownfish. "Pez payaso" is the Spanish translation of clownfish.

How To: Do a Gene Simmons KISS makeup look

No one's done glam quite like those boys from KISS. Gene Simmons is the inspiration for the high drama eye makeup in this video. Watch, follow along with this video makeup application tutorial and learn how to create a Gene Simmons dark glam make up look.

How To: Perform a lower extremity exam on a patient

In this medical video, learn the process of examining the lower extremity of the body. See demonstrations of how you inspect the lower extremity, how you palpate and then perform passive range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle. John D. Gazewood, MD, MSPH, will also teach doctors special maneuvers to help examine a knee injury. With any type of musculoskeletal exam, you're looking for things like deformity, swelling, and changes in coloration.

How To: Water Evergreens in the fall

First of all, he explains that evergreens will have problems if you don't water them late enough into the season. He introduces Ken Mayer who compares two types of evergreens. He shows a tree which has lost its coloration and explains that that tree lost water over the winter. Its roots have been frozen and if the roots are frozen the water cannot circulate where it is needed. When the spring comes, the plant will need water and it will not be able to be supplied with it. It then gives tips o...

Tasty Testing: Artisanal Cheese Reveals Microbial Secrets of Deliciousness

Whether your palate runs to domestic or imported, a piece of cheese can be a real treat for the senses. Its smell, taste, and texture are all parts of its appeal. A big part of what makes that savory wonderfulness comes from the microbes in and on the cheese. Thanks to a team of researchers dedicated to studying those microbes, we have a better understanding of their importance to cheese and us.

How To: Draw a moodily lit face

How to draw a face in MS Paint. The video is obviously made by a professional, it shows a sped up replay of a man using MS Paint to draw a very well done face. He starts with the basic outlines, then moves into coloration and shading. Notice all of the shading is done in unison and correlates with a particular direction that remains the same with all shading properties. Also take note of the fact, that the colors and lines are blending together, that the detail isn't as sharp as a high resolu...

How To: Pick the right sperm donor for you

Just getting the pretty boy genes shouldn't be the only thing you go for. When going for artificial insemination, there's also plenty of rules that you may not be aware of. In this video you'll learn about how the process works to a degree, and what sort of legal actions you should take in the process.

How To: Write your first screenplay

The screenwriter Gene Fowler once said, “Writing is easy: All you do is sit staring at a blank sheet of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.” Here’s how to make the process of writing your first screenplay a little less painful. You will need a formatting guide, a realistic set of expectations and source material. This video provides general knowledge on screenwriting.

News: This Genetic Defect Could Be Why Typhoid Mary Never Got Typhoid Fever

Whether or not a microbe is successful at establishing an infection depends both on the microbe and the host. Scientists from Duke found that a single DNA change can allow Salmonella typhi, the bacteria that causes typhoid fever, to invade cells. That single genetic variation increased the amount of cholesterol on cell membranes that Salmonella and other bacteria use as a docking station to attach to a cell to invade it. They also found that common cholesterol-lowering drugs protected zebrafi...

News: Step Aside Penicillin — A Deep Dive into Fungus Genes Reveals Over 1,300 Potential Antibiotics Waiting to Be Discovered

On October 17, 1943, a story in the New York Herald Tribune read "Many laymen — husbands, wives, parents, brothers, sisters, friends — beg Dr. Keefer for penicillin," according to the American Chemical Society. Dr. Chester Keefer of Boston was responsible for rationing the new miracle drug, penicillin.

News: 14 Types of Bacteria & 10 Strains of Fungus Are Responsible for All the Delicious Flavors of Cheese

If you want to appreciate the value of microbes, look no further than a chunk of cheese. Because cheese roughly traces back to the Neolithic Era, we might say the earliest cheesemakers were the first humans to manipulate microbes—without even knowing it. Now, thanks to microbiologists and the long tradition of cheesemaking, we know a lot more about the microbes that make our favorite types of cheese possible.

How To: Make a retro ray gun prop for film or costumes

It's funny how unevenly the real world keeps pace with science fiction. Smartphones have capabilities that Gene Roddenberry never imagine a portable device could have, but guns still use tiny powder cartridges to launch hunks of metal at things. The phasers, ray guns, and blasters of Star Wars, Star Trek, and other sci-fi works have yet to appear. Don't let that hold you back! This video will show you how to make a cool retro ray gun prop that you can use with a Halloween costume or in a film...

News: Taking Genetic Scissors to Infected Cells Could Cure HIV

Being infected with HIV means a lifetime of antiviral therapy. We can control the infection with those drugs, but we haven't been able to cure people by ridding the body completely of the virus. But thanks to a new study published in Molecular Therapy by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine (LKSOM) at Temple University and the University of Pittsburgh, all that may change.

How To: Make a quick and simple origami envelope

Honestly, we're getting a little tired of purchasing mass-produced cards. Not that we don't adore Papyrus, with its often handmade-like cards and pretty details, but more and more we're finding we enjoy gifting our friends and family something authentic for special occasions.

How To: Make a champagne ginger cocktail

Bartender Gene shows you how to make a unique, healthy, ginger infused cocktail. Simmer 1/2 cup water, sliced, fresh ginger and sugar to make a ginger infused syrup. Remove from heat, let cool, then add 1/2 cup vodka and refrigerate. When your syrup is cool, strain out the ginger and throw it away. Place candied ginger at the bottom of the glass and pour in about a tablespoon of the syrup. Top off with sparkling wine and serve. Follow these easy steps to create a celebratory, unique, good for...

How To: Understand the structure/parts of the cell

In this video the author shows about the different parts of a biological cell. He intends to explain the parts of a cell by using a diagram and incrementally building different parts of the cell explaining them along the way. he starts with drawing the cellular membrane which is the boundary or outer cover of the cell. Now he starts with drawing the DNA which are also called as he genes of the cell. Now he draws and shows other parts of cell called eukaryotes, chromatin and also nucleus which...

How To: Build a pulley system for hanging baskets

We look at hanging baskets that are on a rope and pulley. If you have a hard time reaching up this address that problem. These can be lowered for tending then raised out of harms way. This can be accomplished with a variety of mechanisms available from a hardware store. In this area Gene has utilized a simple rope and pulley. This one is geared so that it is easy to turn and doesn't require a lot of force. Simply bring it down to your level, do some gardening , you never need to stretch, then...

News: Intestinal Viruses Directly Associated with Development of Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an attack on the body by the immune system — the body produces antibodies that attack insulin-secreting cells in the pancreas. Doctors often diagnose this type of diabetes in childhood and early adulthood. The trigger that causes the body to attack itself has been elusive; but many research studies have suggested viruses could be the root. The latest links that viruses that live in our intestines may yield clues as to which children might develop type 1 diabetes.

News: 4 Billion Year Old 'Fossil' Genes May Be Our Secret Weapon Against Infection

The evolution of our infection-fighting systems may have something to teach modern scientists. That's what a group from the University of Granada in Spain found when they studied a protein that's been around for over four billion years. Their work, by senior author José Sánchez-Ruiz and colleagues in the Department of Physical Chemistry, was published in the journal Cell Reports.

News: Bacteria Turned into Factories, Supplying Critical Enzymes to Make Cancer Drugs Cheaper & Save Endangered Yew Trees

Cytochrome P450 (P450s) are proteins found in nearly all living organisms, which play roles that range from producing essential compounds and hormones to metabolizing drugs and toxins. We use some of the compounds synthesized by P450 in plants as medical treatments, but the slow growth and limited supply of these plants have put the drugs' availability in jeopardy and jacked up prices.

News: A Bacteria Could Stop Citrus Greening Disease from Killing Orange Trees

Citrus greening disease — caused by a bacteria spread by psyllid insects — is threatening to wipe out Florida's citrus crop. Researchers have identified a small protein found in a second bacteria living in the insects that helps bacteria causing citrus greening disease survive and spread. They believe the discovery could result in a spray that could potentially help save the trees from the bacterial invasion.

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