Sticky Bacteria Search Results

News: Scientists Are Using the Special Physics of Dragonfly Wings to Create Surfaces That Shred Bacteria on Contact

As drug-resistant bacteria become more commonplace, researchers are looking for new antibacterial strategies to disrupt disease-causing microbes. Some scientists are working to create new drugs, while others are trying out drug combinations. Another group, however, are ditching pharmaceuticals altogether and experimenting with non-drug alternatives.

How To: Use the Sticky Keys feature in Windows 7

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to use the Sticky Keys feature in Microsoft Windows 7. To use the Sticky Keys, click on the Start menu and open Control Panel. In the Control Panel window, double-click on Ease of Access and click on Change how your keyboard works under the Ease of Access Center. Then click on Set up Stick Keys and check the option Turn on Sticky Keys. This video will benefit those viewers who have limited dexterity and find it difficult to use complex keyboard shortc...

News: Natural Antibiotic from Cystic Fibrosis Patient Knocks Out TB

A promising new antibiotic has been discovered in, of all things, another bacteria. Burkholderia bacteria live in diverse habitats, including soil, plants, and humans where they thrive by knocking out other microbes that compete with them for resources or threaten their existence. Scientists have discovered they accomplish this by producing a very effective antibiotic.

How To: Use the Sticky Keys feature in Mac OS X

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to use the Sticky Keys feature in a Mac OS X computer. The Sticky Keys feature is found in the Keyboard tab in the Universal Access menu. To turn on the sticky keys, check the On option. Underneath, users are able to set some options for how the modifier keys are treated. Sticky Keys will allow users to press the keys in a sequence, instead of all at once. This video will benefit those viewers who use a Mac computer and would like to learn how to conf...

News: Long-Term Follow-Up Shows Lasting, Positive Impacts of Fecal Transplants

As unappealing as it sounds, transplants with fecal material from healthy donors help treat tough Clostridium difficile gastrointestinal infections. Researchers credit the treatment's success to its ability to restore a healthy bacterial balance to the bowels, and new research has shown that the transplanted bacteria doesn't just do its job and leave. The good fecal bacteria and its benefits can persist for years.

How To: Fashion a wallet from duct tape

This video tutorial is in the Fine Art category which will show you how to fashion a wallet from duct tape. For this you will need an X-acto knife, duct tape of any color and a tape measure. Rip off a piece of tape about 10 inches long and place it sticky side up. Rip off another piece of same length and place it on the 1st piece face down but, covering only half of the tape as shown in the video. Fold down the 1st piece on top of the 2nd so that you will have only one half piece of sticky ex...

How To: Fix sticky keys on a PC

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to turn off the stick keys on a Windows computer. Begin by clicking on the Start menu and select Control Panel. Double-click on the Accessibility Options and go to the Keyboard tab. Under Sticky Keys, click on Settings and uncheck the box that says "Use Shortcut". Then click OK. Users can also turn off the sticky keys by pressing the Shift button 5 times and click Yes to confirm. This process is very simply, fast and easy to do. This video will benefi...

How To: Turn off sticky keys on a PC

In this how-to video, you will learn how to turn off sticky keys in Windows XP. You will need a computer running Windows XP in order to perform this. First, go to the start menu and click control panel. Go to the accessibility icon and click it. A new window will open. From here, uncheck the option for sticky keys. You can make any further changes in this window. Once you are done, click okay on all the windows to save the new setting. Now you will not have sticky keys when using your compute...

News: Living Bacteria in Clothing Could Detect When You Come in Contact with Pathogens or Dangerous Chemicals

While at work, you notice your gloves changing color, and you know immediately that you've come in contact with dangerous chemicals. Bandages on a patient signal the presence of unseen, drug-resistant microbes. These are ideas that might have once seemed futuristic but are becoming a reality as researchers move forward with technology to use living bacteria in cloth to detect pathogens, pollutants, and particulates that endanger our lives.

News: Like Peaches? Protective Virus Could Save Millions of Dollars in Fruit from Fire Blight

Peach trees and other related plants are susceptible to the devastation caused by fire blight, a contagious bacterial disease. Once contracted, infected trees have to be burned to contain the disease and prevent spread to nearby trees. Increasing resistance to antibiotic treatment has sent scientists in search of alternative ways to deal with the bacteria and prevent its catastrophic damage.

News: Undergrad Student Scientist Made Beer Good for You — and Your Gut Microbes — by Adding Probiotics

When Chan Mei Zhi Alcine chose her senior project, she thought outside the box by thinking inside the bottle. Along with a research team at her university, she found a way to combine health and enjoyment, while meeting a challenge not so definitively met before in alcoholic beverages. She and a research team at her university claim they've created the world's first probiotic sour beer.

How To: Grow bacteria with agar & petri dishes

In this tutorial, we learn how to grow bacteria with agar and petri dishes. First, prepare your agar by swirling it and then pouring it into an open petri dish. Next, close the cap to the petri dish and let it sit for an hour. Next, grab a q-tip and swab it on a surface you prefer. After this, swab it onto the petri dish and let it sit for around a week. When you come back to the dish, you will see all the bacteria that has grown! This is a great science experiment to do for children in schoo...

How To: Make sticky toffee pudding

Celebrity Chef Phil Vickery teaches in this video how to make a British favorite dish: sticky tofee pudding. This tradition dish is served warm and in often during the winter. Phil soaks the dates in boiling water and baking soda to bring out more of their flavor for the dish. While the dates are soaking, he starts creating the sponge part of the cake. With basic ingredients combined, he creates his sponge cake in a way more like a batter than your tradition method of making a sponge cake. Ne...

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