Sculptures Search Results

How To: Make liquid sculptures from a handwarmer

Learn how to make liquid sculptures from a hand warmer in simple steps. First buy an instant reusable hand warmer which has sodium acetate in it and keep it ready. Now use 4 packets of the hand warmer and stir them out with water. Transfer them to a bottle and keep it aside. Take a sodium acetate crystal from a used hand warmer and place it in a plate. Now pour the liquid slowly on the crystal and you can see the liquid turns solid as you pour it. Design your masterpiece using all the liquid....

News: Obsessively Crafted Sculptures Made of Salt

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto's medium of choice is none other than your simple household table salt, fragile and completely ephemeral. Yamamoto creates beautiful installations with the medium, salt being a strong symbol in Japanese death culture (as well as several other cultures around the world:  Hinduism, Catholicism, Egyptian and Aztec mythology).

News: Amazing Tape Sculptures

In the DIY community, much is said about the versatility of duct tape. But it's hardly the only game in town. For proof, one needn't look any further than the impressive, diverse tape sculptures submitted to Scotch's second-annual Off the Role tape sculpture competition.

How To: Make Day of the Dead paper mache sculptures

In this tutorial, we learn how to make day of the dead paper mache sculptures. First, you will make the paper mache sculptures into different body shapes, then use a sharp knife to carve along the sculpture. Use different paints and colors to make the characters more believable and realistic. Use a thick paper mache when making these, because you will lose a lot of layers when you are thinning it down and shaving it into shape. When finished, you will attach the different pieces of body parts...

News: Math Craft Inspiration of the Week: The Kinetic Wave Sculptures of Reuben Margolin

Reuben Margolin builds large scale kinetic sculptures based off of mechanical waves. Some of his sculptures contain hundreds of pulleys all working in harmony with each other to create sinusoidal waves and their resulting interference patterns. He designs them all on paper and does all of the complicated trigonometric calculations by hand. Everything is mechanical; there are no electronic controllers.

News: Math Craft Inspiration of the Week: The Curved Geometric Paper Sculptures of Richard Sweeney

Richard Sweeney is an incredible artist whose body of work consists mainly of sculptures made from paper. His art is often related to origami, and much of his work is related to geometrical forms. I personally really love his modular forms in paper. Many of them are based off of the platonic solids, which have been discussed in previous posts this week. Below are a small number of his sculptures, which are very geometric in nature.

News: Making Sound Sculptures with a Speaker and Cornstarch

Posted below is an interesting video on the effects of low frequency square waveforms on cornstarch. To make, simply mix cornstarch and water, then place on a large speaker hooked up to an amplifier and a signal generator (generating around 20-30 hertz). An old stereo works great, as long as it has an aux-in. There is lots of free signal generating software at arms length, like this one. I found adding a little olive oil into the cornstarch mix makes it easier to handle, and contributes to th...

How To: Make Knot Sculptures from Soft Metals

In mathematics, a knot is a closed circle in a three-dimensional space that crosses itself multiple times. Since it is closed, it has no ends to tie, meaning you can't actually create such a knot. However, if you tie the ends together after you create a knot in the standard way, you will have something that is close to the mathematical description. In this post, we will explore the creation of mathematical knot sculputures using copper tubing and solid solder wire.

News: Math Craft Inspiration of the Week: The Curve-Crease Sculptures of Erik Demaine

Erik Demaine is a Professor of Electronic Engineering and Comp Sci at MI, but he is also an origami folder who has had work displayed at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. He makes some beautiful models and intricate puzzles, but in my opinion the really inspirational work is the curved creased models. In Erik's own words describing the above models: "Each piece in this series connects together multiple circular pieces of paper (between two and three full circles) to make a large circular ramp ...

How To: Use sculpture tools

Sculpture, like many art forms, requires a variety of tools. Learn about the different types of sculpting tools with tips from an expert on working with plaster sculptures in this free art lesson video series.

News: This $50K Sculpture is Made of What?

53-year-old artist Scottish artist David Mach uses tens of thousands of matchsticks to create sculptures of animals, as well as religious and political icons. He first creates a plastic or fiberglass mold, and then inserts the matchsticks, one at a time. His work sells anywhere from $30,000 to $52,000... unless he sets the piece on fire, of course.

News: Mechanical Sculpture Spits Out 441 Perfectly Sphered Water Droplets

Beauty is a fine line between art and science for Pe Lang, a Swiss sculptor living and working in both Berlin and Zurich. The autodidact artist specializes in graceful, hand-built kinetic sculptures made of magnetic, electrical and mechanical devices, all of which are elegant and completely mesmerizing. "Positioning Systems - Falling Objects" is one of his newest contraptions, which feels like a mix of home waterfall fountains, mechanical metronomes and a busy manufacturing plant.

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