Relative Proportions Search Results

How To: Solve math problems using proportions

Proportions or ratios are fundamental concepts of mathematics. A proportions is an equation that states that two ratios are equal. Hence proportion can be written in two ways as a:b=c:d or a/b=c/d. In these equations a and d are called as extremes and b,c are called as means. So when working with proportions we can state that product of the means is equal to the product of the extremes i.e. a*d = b*c. This is obtained by cross multiplying the second form of proportions. In mathematics you are...

How To: Solve proportions

This video describes about how to solve multiple proportions. The first step describes how to cross multiply and solve the equation. There are three proportions solved in this video and they are explained how to arrive the final answer. The first step is multiplying the denominator with the opposite numerator and an answer is arrived and again the same is multiplied to arrive a final answer. Two more proportions are solved in the same manner. The video camera is focused on the white board in ...

How To: Draw manga body proportions

In this video, "Miki Falls" manga cartoonist Mark Crilley shows how to draw body proportions for manga comics. Characters in manga proportions are often proportioned differently than characters in American comics, with larger heads and more childlike bodies. This video show you how to get manga bodies right.

How To: Divide decimals

Here we are, learning how to divide decimals. So we are dividing a whole number or a fraction by a fraction. How this presenter does this is by moving the decimal two places to the right on both the top and bottom of the sum. In other words, he multiplies the two numbers by 100. So 2 becomes 200 and .25 becomes 25. So much easier to divide 200 by 25 than to divide 2 by .25. Provided you've multiplied both the top and bottom by the same amount, the result will be the same, because the relative...

How To: Solve inverse proportions

This video tutorial shows how to solve inverse proportions. The tutor says that in inverse proportion it works differently than in the direct proportion. He says that in inverse proportion more means less or less means more. He uses the example of driving a car to illustrate his idea. He says that if you drive a car with more speed, you take less time to reach a place i.e. here more speed means less time. He goes on and solves a problem involving inverse proportion explaining how to solve the...

How To: Solve direct proportions

You can solve any proportion using the fundamental rule of proportions. First you must build the proportion if you are given a word problem. Decide using logic whether it is a direct proportion (more on one side means more on the other). If so, find the parts of the equation that use the same units and make a fraction with these, putting the smaller number on top. The number left over is linked with one of the other two numbers in the fraction--use logic to figure out which. Put it in the sam...

How To: Solve direct proportions in Algebra

This video describes how to solve direct proportions in algebra which is an important and useful skill in everyday life, school and at work. In this video one would learn key elements of a direct proportion and learn to separate them into a more means more or less means less types of proportion. For example if one had a direct proportion of the more means more type one would simply gather the logical numbers and follow the two simple rules for solving. Overall this video is simple and useful ...

How To: Use the Fundamental Rule of Proportions in Algebra

The author in this video explains the concept of fundamental rule of proportions. Fundamental rule of proportions means cross multiply. He explains that to arrive from an equation which has fractions into the one without equation multiply the top of left side with the bottom of right side and equal it with bottom of left side multiplied with top of the right side. In this way proportions can be cross multiplied to arrive at an algebraic expression. If you want to master the rule of proportion...

How To: Solve word problems using proportions

This video shows the method to solve word problems using proportions. In the given problem, we have to find the time taken by a person to type 390 words if the person takes 1 minute to type 30 words. This can be solved using proportions. We take two fractions which are equal. We type '30 words' in the numerator of the first fraction and 1 minute in its denominator. This fraction must be proportional to the second fraction. The second fraction has '390 words' in the numerator and the variable ...

How To: Find an unknown in a proportion in algebra

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to calculate unknowns in proportions in algebra.

How To: Master inverse proportions in algebra

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to master inverse proportions in Algebra. Inverse proportions have a different rule; more means less or less means more. Let us understand this with an example. It took 175 minutes to drive to the cottage at 80 kmph. If we drive at 100 kmph instead, how long will it take? Here the speed of travel is more but the time taken to complete the journey will be less. So, this is a more means less kind of inverse prop...

How To: Solve word problems with proportions

In this video the instructor shows how to use proportions to solve fractions. When you have a proportions problem with an unknown term, cross multiply and divide it to get the value of that unknown term. For example if given 7/8 = m/4, cross multiply 7/8 with 4, giving 7/2 which is the value of the unknown variable m. So if two quantities are proportionate then you can equate them as shown in the video and cross multiply to get the value of any unknown variable. Proportions are just fractions...

How To: Create confidence intervals for proportions in Excel

If you use Microsoft Excel on a regular basis, odds are you work with numbers. Put those numbers to work. Statistical analysis allows you to find patterns, trends and probabilities within your data. In this MS Excel tutorial from everyone's favorite Excel guru, YouTube's ExcelsFun, the 86th installment in his "Excel Statistics" series of free video lessons, you'll learn how to construct confidence intervals for proportions using NORMSINV function and other formulas.

How To: Use floats and absolute & relative positioning in CSS

In this free video CSS tutorial, you will learn how to use floats and absolute and relative positioning. Whether you're using a fancy WYSIWYG (or what-you-see-is-what-you-get) page editor like Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 or a barebones text editor like Notepad, if you want to build websites, you'll need to have some understanding of HTML (for the structure of your web pages) and CSS (for their style). And this free coder's guide will get you started along that path.

How To: Name cell ranges with relative references in MS Excel

Looking for a primer on how to create and work with names in Microsoft Office Excel? You've come to the right place. In this free video tutorial from everyone's favorite MS Excel guru, YouTube's ExcelIsFun, the 8th installment in his series of Excel name tricks, you'll learn how to name cell ranges with relative cell references instead of the default absolute cell references.

How To: Draw female body proportions in the manga style

In this tutorial, we learn how to draw female body proportions in the manga style. First, you will need to mark your paper evenly with lines to see where you want the head to be at. After this, draw down the rest of the body, looking at the lines as you continue to draw. Use these lines as measurement tools to make the body look proportionate. For example, the head should start at one and the fingers should end at the fifth line. The waist should come at line 3 or 4, then you can finish off t...

How To: Solve ration and proportion problems

This video walks you through the steps of solving a ration and proportion problems. This excellent video shows you a clean blackboard, with the instructors voice showing exactly what to do. Don't fret, any question you may have, will be answered. Watching this video will make you feel like your back in the classroom but rather comfortably from your home.

How To: Record absolute and relative macros in MS Excel 2007

Whether you're interested in learning Microsoft Excel from the bottom up or just looking to pick up a few tips and tricks, you've come to the right place. In this tutorial from everyone's favorite digital spreadsheet guru, ExcelIsFun, the nth installment in his "Highline Excel Class" series of free video Excel lessons, you'll learn how (and when) to record absolute and relative macros in MS Excel 2007.

How To: Use absolute and relative cell references in MS Excel

If you use Microsoft Excel on a regular basis, odds are you work with numbers. Put those numbers to work. Statistical analysis allows you to find patterns, trends and probabilities within your data. In this MS Excel tutorial from everyone's favorite Excel guru, YouTube's ExcelsFun, the 5th installment in his "Excel Statistics" series of free video lessons, you'll learn how to use relative and absolute cell references to save time when writing formulas.

How To: Solve population proportion problems in statistics

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to solve pop. proportion problems in stats.

How To: Compare population proportions in statistics

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to compare population proportions.

How To: Do hypothesis testing with a large sample proportion in statistics

Learn how to do large-sample-proportion hypothesis testing in stats! From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps. For all of the details, watch this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials.

Use MS Excel cell references: relative & absolute

If you're looking to learn how to use Microsoft Excel, a video series from digital spreadsheet guru ExcelIsFun is a great place to start. But which of his many series should you choose? The one titled "Excel Basics," that's which! In this free video MS Excel lesson, the 8th installment in said basics series, you'll learn how to use both relative and absolute cell references in MS Excel.

How To: Find an item's relative position via MATCH in MS Excel

hether you're interested in learning Microsoft Excel from the bottom up or just looking to pick up a few tips and tricks, you've come to the right place. In this tutorial from everyone's favorite digital spreadsheet guru, ExcelIsFun, the 43rd installment in his "Highline Excel Class" series of free video Excel lessons, you'll learn how to use the MATCH function to find the ordinal position (relative position) of an item in a list.

How To: Find a 95% confidence interval for a proportion in statistics

From Ramanujan to calculus co-creator Gottfried Leibniz, many of the world's best and brightest mathematical minds have belonged to autodidacts. And, thanks to the Internet, it's easier than ever to follow in their footsteps (or just study for that next big test). With this installment from Internet pedagogical superstar Salman Khan's series of free math tutorials, you'll learn how to find a 95% confidence interval in statistics.

How To: Find the percent change using proportions

In this video, the instructor shows how to identify the percentage change using proportions. When a given quantity increases or decreases by certain amount then we can calculate the percentage change in the quantity, which can be either increase or decrease based on the new value of the quantity. To solve these kind of situations you should know that the ratio of amount of increase (or decrease) of an amount to its original amount is equal to the ratio of percentage increase (or decrease) to ...

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