Liquids Search Results

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: test the acidity or alkalinity of certain liquids

Hmmm, all you've got is a piece of cabbage but you need to test the acidity or alkalinity of some liquid. What do you do? What DO you do!? Well, you start by watching this video by Steve Spangler. Ahh, the sweet smell of science! Invite your friends over to share in this super smelly but really cool activity. Plug your nose and get ready to make your own red cabbage indicator that will test the acidity or alkalinity of certain liquids.

How To: Stack liquids experiment at home

In this how-to video, you will learn how to stack liquids at home. This will make for a great experiment. You will need a tall, transparent container, molasses or honey, liquid soap, water, vegetable oil, and rubbing alcohol. You might want food coloring and items to float in the container. First, add the molasses to the container. Next, add the dish soap and water. You can add food coloring to this. Make sure to pour it on the side of the container. Add the vegetable oil on top of the water....

How To: Make a Stack of Different Colored Liquids

Here's a simple home science experiment to demonstrate to kids the different weight and viscosity of various liquids. The liquids near the bottom are more dense while the liquids on top are less dense. This can also be used to determine the relative density of solid objects. Place them in the container and see where they float.

Trip on This: Liquids Reaching Freezing Point in the Most Dramatic Fashion

"Freezing Moments" is a great piece of video of different liquids dramatically reaching freezing point, directed by Andrey Muratov. It's cryptically described as "Components of the space. Between existence and 'No!'. Alive - Absorbs." Hmm. Client is also cryptic: GTLK (Gosudarstvennaya Transportnaya Lizingovaya Kompaniya). Appears to be Russian, which would translate to the "State Transport Leasing Company".

How To: Explore Density, Viscosity & Miscibility with a Colorful Layered Liquid Science Experiment

Ever wonder why Jupiter has those colored bands across its surface? Jupiter's enormous mass is made from an array of different liquids, and those fluids do not play well together because of their different makeup. All of the hydrogen- and helium-based fluids are thought not to be miscible, which means that they aren't homogeneous in nature, resulting in strikingly beautiful bands across the planet's surface. But what about viscosity and how that correlates to the development of planets? What ...

How To: Make a twisting particle field effect in After Effects

Particles are very useful for digital artists who want to create liquids, gasses, or clouds of small solids that react naturally. This video tutorial will show you how to use the twisting particle field effect to create a very cool title shown at the beginning of the first video. This particular particle effect is especially great for making galaxies and other fantastic images.

How To: Cook braised lamb shanks

Lamb shanks are very easy to cook. Take 6 lamb shanks and put them in a bowl. Put some olive oil, salt, pepper, rosemary, and thyme on them. Make sure you coat every shank with the seasoning as you turn the shank in the bowl several times. Put them in the oven for 30 minutes at 450 degrees. While the lamb shanks are cooking. Use a saucepan on medium to medium-high setting and heat 2 tablespoons of butter in it. Put some diced celery, carrots, and onions into the pan and saute them in the butt...

How To: Fix a wet laptop

How were you supposed to know your computer can't swim? Isn't it called a laptop? You will need paper towels or lint-free cloth, cotton swabs, a towel, lots of luck, and professional help. Warning: liquids and electricity don't mix. Please make sure your hardware and all points of electrical contact are completely dry before plugging them in.

How To: Build a Cheap Waterproof Flashlight for Diving Depths Past 80 Feet

The pressure underwater is undeniably strong. If you were to fill a balloon with water and take it underwater, it would not burst but would stay the same size because liquids are not compressed. The pressure is the same, inside and outside of the balloon. If you were to fill that same balloon with air instead, the lower it dives into water, the more it shrinks, until it eventually can't take the pressure anymore and bursts.

How To: Use SPH fluids in Houdini 9.5

Created by Houdini Product Specialist Stephen Tucker, this crash course series focuses on the concept of Smooth Particle Hydronamics and how they work within Houdini. The following videos on Particle Fluids continue working with fluid dynamics in Houdini 9.5 and assume that the viewer is relatively familiar with how dynamic simulations work, or have been following along through the series. The basics are still covered including creating water from an object but also include more conceptual si...

How To: Make a bohemian apron for cooking

When cooking, it's always a good idea to wear an apron. They prevent any kind of spills from ruining your clothing and can be used as a shield to proetect you from hot liquids. So in this tutorial, you'll be finding ou thow to make an apron with a bohemian style look to it. Good luck and enjoy!

How To: Measure cooking ingredients

Learn how to measure cooking ingredients. Some home cooks approach cooking as an art form, a splash of this, a dash of that, and soon each culinary creation is deliciously unique. Bakers are more likely to appreciate the scientific side of cooking, relying on the careful measuring of ingredients to ensure consistent results every time they prepare a recipe. To measure cooking ingredients, you'll need a glass measuring cup for liquids, and a dry measure for powders.

How To: Perform the activity density rainbow experiment

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates the details about the activity density rainbow. From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity demonstrating liquids with different densities. Perform the activity density rainbow experiment by watching the step by step instructions in this science tutorial video!

How To: Choose and place a fire extinguisher

Bob and Leslie of the Washington Township Fire Department demonstrate how to choose the right fire extinguisher for your home. Fire extinguishers come in a large range of sizes so be sure to choose one that you can easily handle. If it’s too heavy you won’t be able to use it properly. Fire extinguishers are labeled according to the type of fire they are used on. A is for ordinary combustibles such as wood or paper; B is for flammable liquids such as gas, grease or oil; and C is for electrical...

How To: Make sangria

There is no better addition to a barbecue than a classic sangria. Rebecca shows an easy way of making this Spanish punch. There are various types of sangria which can be prepared easily by just changing the flavor through the use of a variety of fruits.

How To: Make your own nylon

In this tutorial, we learn how to make your own nylon. You will need: pipettes, pipette filler, forceps, beaker, stir rod, sebacoyl chloride and hexanediame solution. Now, pour some of the hexanediame solution into the small beaker. Add in a food coloring if you want to make this a specific color. After this, add in 4 cc's of sebacoyl chloride and carefully drip into the side of the beaker. You should see a layer of where the two liquids are after this. Now, take your tweezers and reach into ...

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