Experiment Search Results

How To: Do an animal blubber (fat) glove experiment

In this video, we learn how to do an animal blubber (fat) glove experiment. You will need: a big bowl with ice water in it, 4 plastic bags, thermometers, and some vegetable shortening. To start, you will take the shortening and scoop it into plastic bag and then stick one of your hands in it. After this, stick two bags over your opposite hand with the temperature into it. Then, you will stick each of your hands in the ice water and see which one lasts longer in the ice water. The fat should k...

How To: Experiment with dry ice

In this tutorial, we learn how to experiment with dry ice. You can buy dry ice from any grocery store, so grab that and you will also need some soap. After this, grab the dry ice with some thick gloves and set aside. Then, put some hot water inside of a container with some soap. Put the dry ice last inside of the container. After you're finished, you can wait to see the reaction occur! It will start to smoke and make different noises which is fun to watch and see! When done, clean up your are...

How To: Do a science experiment with dry ice

In this tutorial, Science Bob shows us how to do a science experiment with dry ice. First, take a block of dry ice and place a quarter on top of it. Make sure you are using rubber gloves when you do this, it's dangerous to touch gloves with your bare hands. When you press the quarter down, it will cause it to vibrate very quickly. You can put any type of metal on top of the dry ice and it will make different noises. This is only one of the many things you can do with dry ice. You can also use...

How To: Experiment the law of inertia

Newtons proposed the concept of inertia. According to him an object at rest tends to stay at test and an object in motion tends to continue in motions unless acted up on by an external force. This is the principle of inertia. The tendency of the body to continue to stay as it was is called its inertia. You can demonstrate this principle with a simple experiment. As shown in the video when the hoop is pulled out the pen cap falls in to the bottle. Here the hoop is acted upon but the cap is not...

How To: Stack liquids experiment at home

In this how-to video, you will learn how to stack liquids at home. This will make for a great experiment. You will need a tall, transparent container, molasses or honey, liquid soap, water, vegetable oil, and rubbing alcohol. You might want food coloring and items to float in the container. First, add the molasses to the container. Next, add the dish soap and water. You can add food coloring to this. Make sure to pour it on the side of the container. Add the vegetable oil on top of the water....

How To: Perform the science experiment "Kool Colors"

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the experiment "Kool Colors." From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity using Kool-Aid as a reactant. The experiment measures the reaction rate of Kook-Aid with steel wool. Perform the Kool Colors science experiment by following the simple step by step outlined in this science tutorial video.

How To: Perform the science experiment "Of Cabbages and Kings"

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the experiment "Of Cabbages and Kings." From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", learn about this chemical reaction featuring cabbage juice. This is a great experiment for your students to perform. Follow the simple instructions outlined in this video and do the "Of Cabbages and Kings" science experiment.

How To: Perform the science experiment "DNA Extraction"

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the DNA Extration experiment. From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this video shows you how to extract DNA from different organisms. Perform this experiment by following the simple step by step instructions outlined in this tutorial.

How To: Perform the science experiment "Dye Detective"

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the experiment "Dye Detective." From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity exploring ink colors. Learn how to perform the Dye Detective experiment by following the simple step by step instructions outlined in this science tutorial video!

How To: Perform the science experiment "Odors Aloft"

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the experiment "Odors Aloft." From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity exploring scents. It's a good introduction to atoms and molecules, especially for little kids. Perform the experiment Odor's Aloft by following the simple step by step instructions in this science tutorial video!

How To: Perform the science experiment "Matter of Degree"

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the experiment "Matter of Degree." From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", these are chemical reactions that result in changing temperatures. Follow the step by step instructions to witness a temperature change. The "Matter of Degree" is a great experiment for students to perform.

How To: Perform the "Lost Labels" science experiment

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the "Lost Labels" experiment. From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity about identifying mystery chemicals. You have an array of unknown powders in miscellaneous jars, and the idea is to try to have your students figure out what are all these mysterious white powders. Learn how to perform the Lost Labels science experiment by followi...

How To: Build a small DIY hydrogen fuel cell science experiment

The hydrogen fuel cell has great potential to replace carbon-based fuels in our vehicle fleets and stave off global warming. It's a difficult concept intellectually, so why not make this fun little science experiment to try it out for yourself? Yes, by following these simple instructions you can make a small hydrogen fuel cell at home that will even power some devices!

How To: Perform the activity density rainbow experiment

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates the details about the activity density rainbow. From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity demonstrating liquids with different densities. Perform the activity density rainbow experiment by watching the step by step instructions in this science tutorial video!

How To: Do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces with different types of food. Yeast is a fungus and it has to eat. After it eats, it produces CO2 gas. The bubbles in bread are produced by the CO2 gas from the yeast. Take five different types of food items and measure out the same quantity for each item. In the video it is 8gms of cookie, oil, flour, salt and sugar. Take six glasses of water and mix one packet of yeast in each glass....

How To: Experiment with magnets and eddy currents

Eddy Currents are little circles of electricity created when metals are moved by magnets or even when magnets are moved by metals. To understand this practically take a regular piece of cardboard and drop it in between a horse shoe magnet. It drops normally with out being effected by the magnet. This is because the cardboard does not conduct electricity. Therefore it does not cause any eddy currents. But instead if you use an aluminum piece in the same way, it falls very slowly, because alumi...

How To: Do water's skin or surface tension experiment

While the concepts of molecule interaction, zero force and energy states might be a little beyond an elementary school science fair's scope, the basic idea of water's capabilities and naturally prepared access to animals and insects that rely on it as a habitat is certainly worth the time. Learn how to duplicate this natural phenomenon in this free video clip series with our expert Scott Thompson as he demonstrates the occurrence of water skin or skin tension, and shows you and your children ...

How To: Do the Coanda effect science experiment

Check out this simple experiment using running water from a tap, and air blown through a straw, as it flows over the back of a vertically hanging plastic teaspoon are used to demonstrate the Coanda effect. Here the attachment of the back of the teaspoon to the flowing stream of fluid (air or water in this case) is what is referred to as the Coanda effect. Watch this how to video and you will be able to create the Coanda effect with your kids at home.

How To: Make a simple volcano project experiment

Vinegar and baking soda (and red food coloring if you're going all out) combine to make quite the little explosion. After you've made a little paper volcano, watch this video tutorial and learn how to carry out a really easy science experiment. You've probably made a volcano before, but you're never to old to make a mess in the name of "science."