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How To: 5 Reasons You Shouldn't Trust TV Doctors

With the countless daytime talk shows starring and featuring doctors, nurses, and other medical specialists, discovering new ways to live a healthy life is just a remote click away. Although their shows might draw you in with incredible facts and mind-blowing secrets to weight loss success, it's important to take each televised recommendation with a bit of suspicion—most of these familiar faces aren't exactly telling the truth.

News: Doctors Use 3D Holograms on the HoloLens to Aid in Collarbone Repair During Surgery

Late last year, two surgeons from the Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia de Jaraguá do Sul in Brazil started using a combination of 3D printing and the Microsoft HoloLens to help plan spinal surgeries. And now, with the rest of their team, they've successfully performed a surgical procedure on their first international patient using their 3D impression planning and augmented reality process.

How To: Give a chest examination for doctors

In this video we learn how to give a chest examination for doctors. First, ask the patient how they are feeling and check their pulse, then watch them breathe. After this, lift their chin up and feel their chest while they are breathing. From here, place both hands on their chest and feel the palpation inside of their body. After this, grab the stethoscope and listen to their heart beat while they are relaxing and breathing as well as deep breathing. As soon as you have listened to the heart ...

How To: Take a patient's sexual history as a doctor or nurse

Sexual activity is a health behaviour and therefore it is important that doctors are able to gather information about sex confidently and competently. In this consultation, the patient presents to his GP with a worry that he may have contracted a sexually transmitted disease. It is important for the GP to enquire about the patient's risk factors in a sensitive and non-judgmental way. The GP needs to gather information about the patient's sexual activity and work with the patient to negotiate ...

RoboDoc: A Kid-Friendly DIY Robot That Makes Doctor Visits a Little Less Scary

Remember going to the doctor when you were a kid? If the word 'traumatizing' comes to mind, you'll love the RoboDoc by MarkusB, a robotic doctor that makes checkups a little less scary (and a lot more fun) for kids. It all started when Markus took his 14-month-old daughter for a checkup. The finger clip that the doctor used to check her pulse terrified her, so Markus decided to build a heartbeat monitor just for kids that's much more likely to make them laugh than cry.

How To: Intubate a patient (endotracheal intubation procedure)

ER showed the world what goes on inside the emergency room, and in every episode, we experienced a common but very important procedure— intubation. But ER never made it seems easy; it showed just how hard it is for medical students to successfully intubate a patient due to fear and naivety. And for real-life doctors and medical practitioners, learning the art of airway management is just as difficult.

How To: Use proper draping techniques during a gynecology exam

In Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN), doctors deal specifically with the female reproductive organs, which means a lot of visual inspection of the vaginal area. Whether you're a doctor, surgeon, nurse, or nursing assistant, knowing how to properly drape a patient is detrimental to the patient feeling protected and secure with the hospital staff, along with having some privacy. This video will cover different types of draping techniques.

How To: Perform a general neurological exam on a patient

As a doctor, sometimes it will be necessary to perform a neurological examination of your patient to rule out any neurological disorders. Your objective is to identify abnormalities in the nervous system, to differentiate peripheral from central nervous system lesions, and to establish internal consistency. This is a great video less that outlines the complete neurological exam procedure. It's great for medical students or doctors, and even nursing students can learn a thing or two.

How To: Make whole wheat stardust muffins

Doctors and nutritionists recommend we eat whole wheat and sprouted grains rather than white or enriched bread because it's healthier for us, but we know you probably don't follow that rule when you're starving and run into a convenience store for a quick snack (Ho hos, anyone?).

How To: Perform a full chest exam on a patient

When you're examining a patient's chest, you start out by simply looking at them— by inspection. It will be hard to count the respirations visually on a healthy person's chest because it moves so little, but in a patient with respiratory distress, the chest might be overactive and strain may show in the neck muscles. Eve Bargmann, M.D., will also teach doctors about palpation, percussion, and auscultation of the chest and back.

How To: Perform a lower extremity exam on a patient

In this medical video, learn the process of examining the lower extremity of the body. See demonstrations of how you inspect the lower extremity, how you palpate and then perform passive range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle. John D. Gazewood, MD, MSPH, will also teach doctors special maneuvers to help examine a knee injury. With any type of musculoskeletal exam, you're looking for things like deformity, swelling, and changes in coloration.

How To: Perform a brief neurological exam on a patient

A brief neurologic examination includes six sections: 1) mental status exam, 2) testing cranial nerves, 3) sensation exam, 4) testing strength, 5) deep tendon reflexes exam, and 6) coordination exam. Eve Bargmann, M.D., shows doctors how to perform this neurological examination on a patient. You will need to do a full neuralgic exam (not in video) if any abnormalities are found. But this is just a brief screening exam during a general physical exam.

How To: Perform a full cardiac exam on a patient (heart exam)

In this video, doctors can learn how to perform a full cardiac examination on a patient. The very first thing a doctor should do is visually inspect the patient, because there's a lot that can be gained by simply examining by eye. You'll want to carefully examine the respiratory pattern of the patient, the nature of their precordium, the anterior part of their chest over the heart. Feeling the pulse is also necessary when starting out this heart exam. To learn more, watch the full video.

How To: Perform a full HEENT exam on a patient

After performing a Vital Signs examination on a patient, usually the next step for a doctor is performing the HEENT. HEENT stands for Head, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. This is basically the first big step in a general physical examination. Like other parts of the general physical examination, it begins with inspection, then proceeds to palpation. Andrew Lockman, from the Department of Family Medicine, also teaches doctors in this video about the required use of several special instruments in o...

How To: Perform an upper extremity exam on a patient

This video will show doctors the process of examining the upper extremity of the body. When you exam the extremities or any joints, it's good to have a systematic approach to how you will examine each joint. Learn about the inspection of each joint, range of motion, palpation and strength testing from Eve Bargmann, M.D. When examining the upper extremity, you should start with the shoulder and work you way down to the elbow, then the wrist, and lastly, the hand.

How To: Perform a general shoulder exam on a patient

In this video lesson for doctors, you will learn how to do a shoulder examination. First, you'll get a review of the procedures for evaluating any joint, and then jump into the basics of inspection of the shoulder, then learn palpation, and range of motion. This is a very general shoulder examination, meant to serve as a refresher course for those medical doctors or medical students who already know the exam procedure.

How To: Deal with heart palpitations

Heart palpitations can be a serious problem if it's not monitored properly. If you're starting to get more and more heart palpitations, or if you've been experiencing them recently, it might be a good idea to watch this video. In it, you will learn what signs to watch out for before going to the doctors, as well as tips and various techniques that you can use to calm them down and keep them to a low frequency.

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