Dissection Search Results

News: Human Dissection Illustrated in Anatomical Pop-Up Books

Before there was Gray's Anatomy, physicians and medical students used anatomical flap books to explore the inner workings of the human body—a scientific illustrated guide that takes its name from the moveable paper flaps that can be "dissected" to reveal hidden anatomy underneath. Similar to pop-up books, these instructional tools mimic the act of human dissection, allowing doctors and students to study the intricacies of the body normally concealed by flesh.

How To: Dissect a human to see the superficial face

You can begin your dissection of the human face if you would like. This video tutorial will help you through your tough times in your anatomy class. It will show you the correct steps to dissecting the superficial face of a human being with your scalpel, to see the musculature. You will also see the branches of the facial nerves. Science is a great step towards learning more about ourselves, so educate yourself with this anatomical look at a corpse.

How To: Dissect a human to see the split pelvis

If you want to know more about the science of the human body, just stop right here at this video tutorial on the dissection of the perineum. This anatomical look at the pelvic outlet will show you right down to the bone, then will show you the osteology of the split pelvis, which is a pelvis in which the symphysis pubis is absent and the pelvic bones are separated, usually associated with exstrophy of the bladder. You'll check out both female and male pelvic regions in this educational look a...

How To: Dissect a human to see the superficial layers of skin

Before you start dissecting the body of a human being, there are a few things you should probably learn first. This anatomical look at the human body will give you just what you need to delve into your human dissection. Just watch this video tutorial on a few bony landmarks you should be aware of by palpating, like the clavicles, the sternum and sternal notch, the rib cage, and the pelvic region.

How To: Completely disassemble Verizon's Motorola Droid X

If you can't wait to see what's inside your new Motorola Droid X mobile device from Verizon Wireless, this video will show you the complete dissection process. Just because the Droid X is new, doesn't mean that the cell phone isn't prone to damage or minor repairs, like the touchscreen. Watch to learn the whole Droid X disassembly, and you can get step-by-step text and photo instructions at DroidX.net.

How To: Dissect a human to see the superficial neck

Get out your scalpel and remove the skin of your cadaver, because you're going to learn how to dissect a human to see the superficial neck. This anatomy video tutorial will teach you how to cut away the platysma muscle, which is a muscle of facial expression. You can't beat science, and you can't beat looking at the superficial neck of a human corpse.

How To: Dissect a male bull reproductive tract

Check out these educational videos for veterinarians and curious eyes on the anatomy of the male reproductive tract in the bull. Here you will see, in three parts, the scrotum of the bull, which contains both of the testes. The scrotum is a thinner skin area of the rest of the beast, with less hair. Upon dissection of the male bovine scrotum, you will see the tunica dartos muscle and some stratum tissue. The testes is the structure that contains the sperm producing cells.

How To: Dissect a human to see into the deep neck

The first step in this human anatomy video tutorial is reflecting the sternal cleidomastoid muscles from the attachment to the sternum and the clavicle. Sounds fun, huh? Well, science is fun, and dissecting a human is great, especially for an anatomy class. Here, you will learn how to take a closer look at the deep neck of a human cadaver, like the muscle tissue and the arteries.

How To: Dissect a human to see the pelvic outlet

If you failed your anatomy class in that medical college you so dearly paid for, you might want to think about taking it again. To help you out, just watch this video tutorial on dissecting a human, concentrating on the pelvic outlet. So, get out your scalpel and learn how to cut away to the bladder and the pelvic outlet, in which we see a split pelvis, which is a pelvis in which the symphysis pubis is absent and the pelvic bones are separated, usually associated with exstrophy of the bladder.

How To: Dissect a human to see the abdominal autonomics

Need to check out the posterior abdominal wall of a human being? Well, go no further. This human anatomy video tutorial will show you how to dissect a human for a closer look at the abdominal autonomics, the genital and urinary systems, the diaphragm, and the posterior abdominal wall. You need to get most of the superficial layers out of the way, so get your scalpel out and get cutting. You'll even check out the kidney itself in this educational look at the insides of a corpse.

How To: Dissect a human to see the organs in the thorax

The science of the human body is a glorious thing, and educating yourself through its anatomy is a great way to learn. Here you'll learn how to dissect a human to see the organs in the thoracic cavity. You'll also see the lungs and pleural sacs, and the heart and pericardial sacs in the thorax. So, cut out that heart and lungs with a scalpel or knife and extract it for a closer anatomical look. This video tutorial is all you'll need to pass anatomy 101.

How To: Anatomize the human head, neck and skull

This is a special four-part series on the human head, neck and skull. Medical students can greatly benefit from watch this anatomy video series. Dr. Gita Sinha "dissects" all of the information pertaining to the head and neck. Dr. Sinha is Assistant Professor for the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology at Dalhouse University. Each of these videos cover a different topic:

How To: Dissect a human to see the axillary fossa (armpit)

The axillary fossa is classically known to most people as the armpit. Here, in this human anatomy video tutorial, you'll see how to dissect the axillary fossa, which in its technical definition is the hollow under the upper part of the arm below the shoulder joint, bounded by the pectoralis major, the latissimus dorsi, the anterior serratus muscles, and the humerus, and containing the axillary artery and vein, the infraclavicular part of the brachial plexus, lymph nodes and vessels, and areol...

How To: Dissect a left aortic lymph node with a robotic arm

This medical how-to video details a robotic left aortic lymph node dissection in a patient with endometrial cancer using the Standard da Vinci system. The dissection on the right side of the aorta has been completed and the anatomy is outlined. The dissection on the left side of the aorta is highlighted in this video. Watch and learn how a dissection of a lymph node is performed on a patient. This surgical video is intended for medical students.

How To: Dissect aortic lymph nodes with a robotic arm

This medical how-to video demonstrates a bilateral lymph node dissection in a patient with endometrial cancer using the da Vinci system with the HD optical system. The HD optical system allows surgeons to perform more precise anatomical dissections with enhanced dexterity. Watch and learn how a dissection of a lymph nodes is performed on a patient. This surgical video is intended for medical students.

News: Full-Body Motion Controller HoloSuit Coming Soon to Kickstarter

A few days before Christmas last year, we saw the first glimpse of HoloSuit, a new motion controller by startup Kaaya Tech. This full-body motion controller is designed as a tracksuit with sensors that can be used to control devices such as a computer or Microsoft HoloLens, and now it's getting ready to start production, with an upcoming Kickstarter campaign planned to go live soon.

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